Art and Fear

   I return to this book again and again for reinforcement of the value art brings to the world.
I return to this book again and again for reinforcement of the value art brings to the world.

“This book is about what it feels like to sit in your studio or your classroom, at your wheel or keyboard, easel or camera, trying to do the work you need to do. It is about committing your future to your own hands, placing free will above predestination, choice above chance… It is about finding your own work.”

— David Bayles and Ted Orland

Are there any artists who do not question themselves and their work?

I know I’m not alone in the artist struggle… Many of us grew up in similar family and social environments where art was not “serious” or “important” work. Art was something that was done around the edges of real work…  after dinner, or on the weekends as a hobby. 

Creativity was enjoyed in my family, but its real value was as a tool to accomplish important things.

If you identify with this, the book “Art and Fear” may be a valuable tool to bring into your art practice. When I first got the book, I read it and realized how helpful it could be as an audio recording. Since then I have listened to it many times while working in my studio, and sometimes when I am walking or driving. When I return to a section of the book I have already listened to, I am sure I hear things that were not there before. I like to imagine that as I grow as an artist, my ears grow as well!

As usual, I welcome your insights and comments. We are all in this together!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s